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May 06, 2012

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Steven M

If the number of voters who knows about the broad scope of the amendment continues to increase (now at 46%, the highest ever) then why has support for the amendment been increasing? Shouldn't it be the reverse?

I think most NC voters actually do not support civil unions and have been saying that to sound moderate. It is the only explanation I can think of, because at this point, there is no reason it should be passing.

Unfortunate.

Meredith Hunt

"In some sense North Carolinians are voting against their own beliefs. 53% of voters in the state support either gay marriage or civil unions, yet a majority also support the amendment that would ban both."

North Carolinians apparently are more concerned about the distortion of the meaning of marriage than they are about establishing a NEW category of civil union. Maybe they realize that marriage between a man and a woman IS a civil union, as the Marriage Protection Act says. Your analysis of your poll is BIASED. It also attempts to coach the opponents of the MPA.

Meredith Hunt

Correction: I mean the "Marriage Protection Amendment" not Act.

chris

With your polling on amendment one staying rather static over the last several weeks, it seems it's passage is inevitable. So disappointing to know that bill could have been defeated with a little more education.

Z

Meredith: The actual question used in the poll (hint: it's linked to in the article) specifically asks whether gay couples should be allowed to form civil unions; civil unions as they relate to straight couples have no bearing on the question at all. You're the one making baseless speculations that conform to your worldview.

I would add that not banning future legal recognition is not at all equivalent to actually establishing that recognition, but I suppose the nuance can be lost on many people.

Brian

I think we have to understand that although there are growing liberal pockets of voters in NC, the state as a whole still remains pretty conservative in comparison to the rest of the country. Remember, it is still a southern state with lots of religious fundamentalists, and these people simply do not want to dialogue on the marriage issue. Sad, but LGBT people have to hope that they will have success in Minnesota, Washington, Maine, and Maryland in November.

bob the builder

so lefties: you wanted to know what Democracy looks like?

belegoster

Score another one for PPP! Final tally: 61-39

Jay

You might wish to explain to your readers, now that results are in, how it is possible that 21% of Democrats chose no preference rather than vote for Obama. A similar phenomena occurred in PA where Obama ran some 14% behind the Democratic ticket. I think you missing something in your polling. Why would substantial numbers of Democrats (a total of a million Dems voted) in the case of North Carolina not vote for Obama against no preference?

John

About your poll comment on Mike Causey closing the gap on Richard Morgan in the Insurance Commissioner primary election in North Carolina, I believe it is because Republicans were starting to wise up about their choices: Would my party vote for someone that just a few years ago had been EXPELLED (remarkable, but very true) by the NC Republican Party for being a traitor to the Party? Causey, if he goes forward with a runoff, would be wise to remind voters about Morgan's connection to his felon co-Speaker of the House, Jim Black. Also, I think Causey's ground efforts campaigning paid off for him and countered that atrocious advertisement by Morgan. I hope you will poll this race again before the runoff. If Richard morgan is the 2012 republican nominee, I'm voting to reelect the Democrat, Wayne Goodwin, for commissioner. Or anybody but Richard Morgan.

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